Week 7: May 12, 2013

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Ernie Brames was a third generation hog farmer in Indiana who taught me about ethanol policy and hard work and loving what you do. We climbed up to the top of his grain silo at dawn and looked out over his farm and were quiet. You would have loved the sound inside the silo-- hollow and still.

Ernie Brames was a third generation hog farmer in Indiana who taught me about ethanol policy and hard work and loving what you do. We climbed up to the top of his grain silo at dawn and looked out over his farm and were quiet. You would have loved the sound inside the silo-- hollow and still.


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Dear Amanda,

Nothing about this is fit for broadcast.  I spoke with Geoff at a loud birthday party this weekend and the audio quality is crap. But I've filed our conversation under "lessons on how to live." If you were with me, you might have made a photo of Geoff's hands, which read like a map of the countless cars he's lovingly repaired and restored. Sometimes a car he is working on will have a problem that stumps him. It'll keep him up at night until he figures it out. 

Forty years ago Geoff made what, in hindsight, was probably one of the best business decisions anyone could make: he opened a Ferrari repair shop in Silicon Valley. People called him crazy.

I can't remember the last time I spoke with someone who loves their job so much. He travels to the factory in Italy every year to learn more and see vintage cars. When I come across people who strive for the highest order of competence, and do it out of love, I always think of you.